January 2015

September 2016

May 2017

Equitable Mediation: Featured in "How to Cope with Divorce"

Excerpt Below - 

Find a physical outlet every day.

It could be anything from stepping outside for a 20 minute walk, yoga, cycling/spinning, swimming, dance class, pilates, jogging etc.

The importance isn't necessarily to get into shape, it's about dedicating a time every day for you. It's easy to reject/neglect our bodies while going through any trauma and/or loss because our focus is on how to survive the unwanted change, and divorce is, in my opinion, a combination of both trauma and loss.

Know your rights.

Applied knowledge is power so the more you can educate yourself on the legalities of a divorce, the more one can self-advocate for what they deserve/need/want through the divorce process.

The more you know, the more confident one may feel. Feeling secure in a divorce is important and this is one way to gain security.

Don't lose focus, but also know when to step away.

Understanding that this process can be highly emotional and daunting, it's easy to be fully consumed, which can negatively affect other facets of one's life.

Set certain dates/times to dedicate to the process and also set times to focus on other parts of life - family, children, friends, self-care, work and/or community. Finding balance is key.

March 2020

I was recently invited to collaborate on an expert panel and share some insights on how to deal with the stress of life and divorce on hold and self-quarantine with someone you no longer wish to be married to. Here are my best tips:

  • Create written schedules around intentional time and space apart while in the home dwelling. For example, have responsibilities, chores, activities that allow active distance, ie, one washes the vehicles while the other washes the bathroom, etc.

  • Have open communication around each other’s boundaries and reflect back what you’re hearing so there are no misunderstandings or confusion around these boundaries.

  • Devote an intentional time and space to meet together to go over necessities, ie. child schedules, chores, grocery shopping, etc. Do not use this time to talk about anything else.

  • Take the time to physically separate your belongings and move your sleep spaces. Assign different bedrooms (if they’re not done already). Own your new space!

  • Utilize any online platform you feel comfortable with to connect to your loved ones, social circle and family members to have an extra level of support.

  • Don’t have sex or physical intimacy that could cause ambiguity or confusion in your judgement and the direction of divorce.

You can read the full article here: Coronavirus, Self-Quarantine and Divorce: Experts Share Survival Tips

Bridget Tremblay PsyD, LMFT | 500 Forest Ave. Suite 1A | Portland, ME. 04101 | (207) 321-1599